Wills

Welcome to this legal advice and update page which offers a general introduction to the legal issues and processes involved in making a will.

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Wills

OVERVIEW

A will enables a person (or persons) to decide what happens to their money, property and possessions after they die. Any will needs to be formally witnessed and signed to make it legally valid. Wills can be updated by making an official alteration (called a codicil) or a completely new will can be made. Without a will, the Laws of Intestacy come into play which means the State directs who inherits and benefits.

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Mental Incapacity in Wills: a reflection on the tests established under both Common Law and the Mental Health Act 2005

In order for a will to be valid, the maker of the will (testator/testatrix) must have mental capacity. At times as lawyers, we find ourselves on a rather sticky wicket in that it has now become increasingly common for wills to be contested based on grounds of mental incapacity. Legallybetter member firm Bhogal Partners gives a review of the current legal position and their reflections on the current tests in place. More information at:

http://bhogalpartners.co.uk/mental-incapacity-in-wills-a-reflection-on-t...